Lawyers: Chess icon Bobby Fischer didn’t father girl
Champion’s remains exhumed in July for paternity test. Struggle for his estate continues
By JENNIFER QUINN, Associated Press

DNA tests have shown that chess genius Bobby Fischer was not the father of a 9-year-old girl from the Philippines, bringing a paternity claim against his estate to a close, two lawyers familiar with the case said Tuesday.

The test result was announced in Reykjavik District Court, said lawyer Gudjon Olafur Jonsson, who represents Fischer’s two American nephews in their own claim on his estate.

Fischer’s remains were exhumed in July so samples could be taken to determine if he had fathered Jinky Young, whose mother Marilyn said she had a relationship with the chess icon. Jinky, who lives in the Philippines with her mother, flew to Iceland last year to provide her own sample.

“I can confirm that the result of the DNA report excluded Bobby Fisher from being the father of Jinky Young, and therefore the case has come to a close,” said lawyer Thordur Bogason, who represents Jinky.

Though the paternity case has ended, the wrangling over Fischer’s estate continues. He died aged 64 in Iceland in January 2008, leaving no will.

Jonsson said the elimination of the paternity claim simplifies the case between Fischer’s nephews and the woman who was his long-term partner. The case is scheduled to be heard in Reykjavik next month, Jonsson said, adding he hopes for a result by the end of the year.

Fischer was born in Chicago and raised in Brooklyn, New York. His 1972 defeat of Boris Spassky of the Soviet Union for the world chess championship — a tournament that was played in Reykjavik — made him world-famous and an American hero.

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Chess champion Bobby Fischer did not father girl

Bobby Fischer is not the father of a nine-year-old girl from the Philippines, a lawyer in Iceland said after the chess champion’s remains were exhumed in July for DNA tests.
Published: 11:39PM BST 17 Aug 2010

The mother of Jinky Young said she had a relationship with the chess star.

Jinky, who lives in the Philippines with her mother, Marilyn, flew to Iceland last year to provide her own sample.

Fischer died in Iceland at the age of 64 in January 2008. He left no will, and legal cases over who has the right to the US-born player’s estate are ongoing.
Thordur Bogason, a Reykjavik-based lawyer who represents Jinky, said on Tuesday: “the DNA report excluded Bobby Fisher from being the father of Jinky Young, and therefore the case has come to a close.”

Fischer became world famous in 1972 when he defeated Boris Spassky of the Soviet Union for the world chess championship in a tournament, played in Reykjavik, that brimmed with Cold War symbolism.

Fischer became an international hero, but his later life was dominated by his erratic, eccentric behaviour. He lost his world title in 1975 after refusing to defend it against Anatoly Karpov. He dropped out of competitive chess and largely out of view, spending time in Hungary and the Philippines and emerging occasionally to make outspoken and often outrageous comments, sometimes attacking the United States.

Full article here.

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